What’s All the Static About? Cell Phones and Radiation.

by Ron & Lisa Beres on June 23, 2010 · 0 comments

What’s All the Static About? Cell Phones and Radiation.Have you heard? On Tuesday, San Francisco became the first U.S. jurisdiction to adopt a city ordinance requiring retailers to post the radiation levels of mobile phones. So, what’s all the static about? Guest blogger, Oram Miller, BBEI, of Create Healthy Homes explains the hidden dangers of Wireless Communications: cell phones, cordless telephones and WiFi.

Have you ever felt a burning or tingling on the side of your head after using your cellphone? Are you starting to forget where you left your car keys?

You may be having health effects from using your cellphone or cordless telephone. The cellphone industry and governmental regulatory agencies, at least on this side of the Atlantic, say that cellphones are safe, while the research is saying otherwise. Critical information is kept from consumers by media conglomerates in the US who often side with big business. Studies are being cherry-picked to hide the true health risks of cellphone use. Americans are not being told what Europeans have known for years: that wireless communications cause a host of medical problems.

These can include anything from memory loss, “brain fog,” chronic fatigue and ADD to pre-Alzheimer’s and even cancer. Brain tumors and strokes among people in their 20s are on the rise. Young children who use cellphones have a five-fold increase in the rate of leukemia. And the health effects are cumulative.

Research shows that humans are affected by two frequencies transmitted by wireless devices, including cellphones, cordless telephones and Wi-Fi (wireless Internet) in routers and computers. Yes, there is a “Specific Absorption Rate,” or SAR, for each cellphone on the market, and no cellphone can be sold if it’s SAR is beyond the level known to cause ill health. In Israel, manufacturers are required to post the SAR for each cellphone on display in the store but that information is buried in the back of your manual in this country.

The SAR refers to the heating effect on cell proteins from the carrier wave, which is in the gigahertz (billions of cycles per second) range. But the SAR is not the problem. What worries scientists most is what is known as the low-frequency Information-Carrying Radio Wave, or ICRW, which is the actual frequency that carries the voice data from the cellphone to the cell tower and back again.

The problem is the ICRW causes numerous health problems that are not being mentioned by the industry. Problems like damage to the blood-brain barrier, formation of stress proteins and pre-cancerous lesions, and loss of the ability of cells to communicate with each other.

This low-frequency ICRW is too weak to be transmitted by itself, so it is piggy-backed onto a much faster heating frequency in the microwave range. The problem is we are exposed to both frequencies and health effects are mounting in the human population.

We remain in this window of time, a grace period if you will, where we are seeing an explosion of wireless use as we install the latest apps. We are rapidly increasing our exposure to radio frequencies and its hidden dangers without those health effects showing up yet on any mass scale among the human population. But when that time does come, watch out! Researchers and doctors expect millions of people to develop cancer and Alzheimer’s Disease while still in their 30s, unable to function in society.

What to do? Check back soon for our next post discussing practical strategies you can employ to protect yourself. Two hints: reduce use, and “distance is your friend.”

Oram Miller, BBEI, is a Certified Building Biology Environmental Inspector. He provides EMF (electromagnetic field) evaluations for homes and offices locally in Southern California and nationwide over the telephone. You can contact Oram at 310.720.7686 or www.createhealthyhomes.com

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